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INTERPRETATION
& CIVIL RIGHTS

CIVIL RIGHTS ACT PROTECTIONS FOR LIMITED-ENGLISH PROFICIENT PEOPLE

Anyone who cannot or would prefer not to speak English when receiving medical care in a hospital can ask for an interpreter for their preferred language.

Title VI of the Civil Rights Act requires healthcare providers who receive federal funding to provide reasonable access to language services. Since most hospitals and medical facilities do receive federal funds, they generally should provide access to language interpretation and translation upon request.

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See the personal impact that language services can make.

Of the 316 million people living in the United States today, about 60 million of us speak a language other than English at home.


9% of our total population is limited-English proficient, or speak English less than very well.

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Background

AN INTERPRETER’S IMPACT

Being ill is extremely stressful, and receiving medical information in an unfamiliar language often makes it a tougher situation. Having an interpreter there to facilitate communication in these situations can be, and often is, a life saver.

By becoming a CyraCom interpreter, you will:
  • • Enable people to take advantage of their rights.
  • • Enable people to fully understand their medical care and empower them to take charge of their own health.
  • • Help people access healthcare and create better health outcomes, regardless of the language they speak.
How Can You Make A Difference?

Now that you know about Title VI, you might consider encouraging friends, family, and community members to exercise their right to an interpreter in medical encounters.
By joining CyraCom as an interpreter, you may take an active role in eliminating language barriers for limited-English proficient people.